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Go to home Workplace Mediator Certification
"Crucial skills and methods for early resolution of employee conflicts
and the prevention of litigation"
Click here to register
 
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Transformative Mediation

Is MTI's Training Transformative Mediation?

MTI's mediation model, which is designed primarily for application in the workplace, represents a blend of transformative and problem-solving approaches.

It is facilitative, not directive. The mediator maintains the "Essential Process of Mediation" (defined as "Face-to-face talking between the parties about the problem without interruption for sufficient time to solve the problem"), assisting the individuals to find their own solution to the organizational problem caused by their conduct. The responsibility and authority for resolving the conflict, and solving the problem, lie entirely with the parties; the mediator does not introduce or recommend solutions.

MTI's model is designed for people who have an on-going interdependent relationship (generally in the workplace); consequently, it is not simply intended to "settle" an immediate dispute. Its focus is on building a basis for future cooperation, not solely on solution of a single issue in isolation from the broader context of their relationship. It produces behaviorally specific agreements regarding future behavior that may constitute obligatory actions by each party.

MTI's model was developed by Dan Dana in the early 1980's, over ten years before the current form of Transformative Mediation became popular.

For more information:

See also this Annotated Bibliography on Transformative Mediation.

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